What to Do About Workplace Bullying and How Can a Coach Help

Workplace Bullying

Workplace bullying is a growing concern in today’s corporate landscape. While it can take many different forms, it is generally defined as behaviour that is repeated, intentional, and targeted at an individual or group of individuals to cause harm or distress. Workplace bullying can be physical, emotional, or verbal and can take place in a variety of settings, including offices, factories, and warehouses.

The impact of workplace bullying can be significant and can manifest in a variety of ways, including anxiety, depression, and decreased job satisfaction. In some cases, workplace bullying can even lead to physical symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, and high blood pressure.

If you are experiencing workplace bullying, it is important to take action as soon as possible. In this article, I will explore what to do about workplace bullying and how a coach can help.

What is Workplace Bullying?

Workplace bullying can take many different forms, but some of the most common behaviours include:

  • Verbal abuse, including shouting, swearing, and name-calling
  • Physical abuse, including pushing, hitting, and kicking
  • Intimidation, including threats of violence or harm
  • Isolation, including excluding an individual from work-related activities or social events
  • Sabotage, including intentionally damaging an individual’s work or reputation
  • Undermining an individual’s work, such as taking credit for their work or excluding them from meetings or decision-making processes

It is important to note that workplace bullying is different from constructive criticism or feedback. Constructive criticism is intended to help an individual improve their performance, while workplace bullying is intended to cause harm or distress.

10 world-class mindset shifts that will…

~ Accelerate your success. 

~ Bring out your inner genius.

~ Create a lasting impact on your happiness.

Price From: $11.49

What to Do About Workplace Bullying

If you are experiencing workplace bullying, there are several steps that you can take to address the issue:

  1. Document the behaviour: Keep a record of any incidents of workplace bullying, including the date, time, and details of the incident. This will be important if you decide to take further action.

  2. Talk to your supervisor: If you feel comfortable doing so, talk to your supervisor about the behaviour that you are experiencing. They may be able to intervene and help resolve the situation.

  3. Talk to HR: If your supervisor is unable or unwilling to help, talk to your company’s human resources department. They can provide guidance and support and may be able to initiate an investigation into the behaviour.

  4. Seek support: It is important to have a support system in place when dealing with workplace bullying. This may include friends, family, or a therapist.

  5. Consider legal action: If the behaviour is particularly egregious or is causing significant harm, you may want to consider legal action. A lawyer can help you understand your options and take the necessary steps to protect your rights.

Should You Seek Other Employment?

In some cases, seeking other employment may be the best decision for individuals who are experiencing workplace bullying. While it is important to take action to address the issue and protect your well-being, there may be situations where the best course of action is to leave the job and find a healthier work environment.

Here are some reasons why seeking other employment may be a better decision:

  1. The workplace culture is toxic: If the workplace culture is toxic and there is a pervasive culture of bullying, it may be difficult to effect meaningful change. In this case, leaving the job and finding a healthier work environment may be the best decision.

  2. The stress is impacting your health: Workplace bullying can take a significant toll on an individual’s mental and physical health. If the stress of the situation is impacting your health and well-being, it may be necessary to leave the job to prioritize your health.

  3. The company is not taking action: If the company is not taking action to address the issue of workplace bullying, despite your efforts to report the behaviour and seek support, it may be a sign that the company is not committed to creating a healthy work environment. In this case, leaving the job may be necessary for your wellbeing.

  4. The bullying is affecting your work performance: If the bullying is affecting your ability to perform your job duties, it may be necessary to leave the job to protect your professional reputation and career advancement.

While seeking other employment may be a difficult decision to make, it is important to prioritize your health and well-being in the face of workplace bullying. Before making a decision, it may be helpful to talk to a coach or counsellor to discuss your options and develop a plan for moving forward.

It is important to note that seeking other employment should not be the only solution for addressing workplace bullying. It is important to take action to address the issue, whether through reporting the behaviour, seeking support, or taking legal action. 

In conclusion, seeking other employment may be the best decision in some cases of workplace bullying, particularly when the workplace culture is toxic, the stress is impacting your health, the company is not taking action, or the bullying is affecting your work performance. 

How Can a Coach Help?

A coach can be a valuable resource for individuals who are experiencing workplace bullying. Here are some ways that a life coach can help:

  1. Providing emotional support: A coach can provide a safe and supportive environment for individuals to discuss their experiences and emotions related to workplace bullying.

  2. Developing coping strategies: A coach can help individuals develop coping strategies to manage the impact of workplace bullying on their mental and emotional well-being.

  3. Developing communication skills: A coach can help individuals develop communication skills to effectively communicate their concerns to their supervisor or HR department.

  1. Setting goals: A coach can help individuals set goals for their personal and professional growth, despite the challenges presented by workplace bullying.

  2. Building resilience: Workplace bullying can take a significant toll on an individual’s resilience and self-esteem. A coach can help individuals build their resilience and regain their confidence.

  3. Developing a plan of action: A coach can help individuals develop a plan of action for addressing workplace bullying, which may include strategies for communication, self-care, and seeking support.

A coach can also help organizations address workplace bullying at a systemic level. Here are some ways that a coach can support organizations in addressing workplace bullying:

  1. Developing policies and procedures: A coach can work with organizations to develop policies and procedures that address workplace bullying, including reporting mechanisms, investigation processes, and disciplinary actions.

  2. Conducting training: A coach can conduct training for employees and managers on the topic of workplace bullying, including how to recognize it, prevent it, and address it.

  3. Facilitating conversations: A coach can facilitate conversations between employees and managers to address workplace bullying and foster a culture of respect and inclusion.

  4. Providing ongoing support: A coach can provide ongoing support to employees who have experienced workplace bullying, including coaching and counselling services.

FAQs

Q: What should I do if my supervisor is the one who is bullying me? A: If your supervisor is the one who is bullying you, it can be difficult to address the issue. In this case, it may be necessary to speak to a higher-level manager, HR, or legal counsel.

Q: Can a coach help me if I have already left my job due to workplace bullying? A: Yes, a coach can still help you even if you have left your job. They can provide support and guidance as you navigate the aftermath of workplace bullying, including finding a new job and processing your experiences.

Q: How can I tell the difference between workplace bullying and constructive criticism? A: Workplace bullying is behaviour that is intended to cause harm or distress, while constructive criticism is intended to help an individual improve their performance. If you are unsure whether the behaviour you are experiencing is workplace bullying or constructive criticism, talk to a coach or HR representative for guidance.

Conclusion

Workplace bullying is a serious issue that can have a significant impact on an individual’s mental and emotional well-being. If you are experiencing workplace bullying, it is important to take action as soon as possible. This may include documenting the behaviour, talking to your supervisor or HR, seeking support, and considering legal action.

A coach can be a valuable resource for individuals who are experiencing workplace bullying. They can provide emotional support, help develop coping strategies, and assist in developing a plan of action for addressing the issue. Additionally, coaches can support organizations in addressing workplace bullying at a systemic level by developing policies and procedures, conducting training, and facilitating conversations.

Remember, no one deserves to be bullied at work. By taking action and seeking support, you can protect your well-being and regain your sense of empowerment and control.

☕Thanks for reading my blog post! You Rock!😉

Interested in what I do?
🌟I help people to discover, develop and use their resources to empower themselves & create change in their lives.

🌟 Need my help? Simply follow this link, send me a message and I’ll get back to you asap.

Donovan – Life Coach – 078 952 0328

Donovan - Life Coach

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

× How can I help you?